Project of The Month: Alki Homestead

Image by Western Neon © 2018

Western Neon is delighted to collaborate with Alki Homestead building owner Dennis Schilling and the Southwest Seattle Historical Society on the restoration of the iconic Alki Homestead neon sign. After two years of decommission, the sign has been restored to its former glory and can be found atop the historic Alki Homestead in West Seattle.

Image by Western Neon © 2018

Built in 1904, the former Fir Lodge has been through many changes in its lifespan. Notably, it was awarded Landmark Status by the City of Seattle in 1995. A fire in 2009 caused extensive damage to the already weak building, and efforts to get restoration approval proved to be difficult. Dennis Schilling took ownership of the historic property in March 2015 and created an approved restoration plan. Now, three and a half years later, Dennis and his son Matt are nearing completion of the project with help from the Southwest Seattle Historical Society.

Image by Western Neon © 2018

The original 1950s Alki Homestead restaurant sign came down in July 2016 after being vandalized. Western Neon was approached with the opportunity to fully restore the sign in February of 2018 by Dennis Schilling. The project was extensive, and many steps were taken to restore the sign to its original glory. The team at Western Neon began by sanding and reshaping the metal body of the sign. Next, the body was given a fresh coat of paint. Finally, the glass team bent all new lettering for the sign in red and green neon. The sign was installed early this month and now glows in its rightful place atop the Alki Homestead.

 

The space in the ground floor of the renovated building now has new tenants – Mike and Victoria Easton, owners of the restaurant Il Corvo. Mike plans to open a new Italian restaurant, Il Nido, as a home base accompaniment to the Pioneer Square eatery. Keep an eye out for restoration updates and the future restaurant opening! If you’d like to learn more about the history of the Alki Homestead, visit the Southwest Seattle Historical Society website and their Log House Museum.